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Grampians National Park - photos

The Balconies photo
Reed Lookout photo
Cathedral Rock photo
Boroka Lookout photo
Grand Canyon photo
Mt Sturgeon photo
Serra Range photo
Mt Abrupt photo
Mt Mitchell View photo
Serra Range photo
Serra Range photo
Serra Range photo
Grand Canyon photo
Pyrenees View photo
Southern Grampians photo
Mt Abrupt photo
Mt Mitchell View photo
Lake Wartook photo
Sandstone photo
Serra Range photo
    

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About Grampians National Park

The Grampians is the third largest national park in Victoria Australia. It has a prestigious National Heritage listing for its outstanding landscape and cultural heritage in the form of aboriginal rock art. The Grampians are a geographically defined as a series of mountain ranges some 90 kilometres in length, reaching heights just over 1000 metres that rise ubruptly from the surrounding plain.

This mountain range is actually the beginning part of the Great Dividing Range which is Australia's biggest mountain range. It is also the fifth longest range in the world.

The Grampians are made of upthrust sandstone ridges and has valleys covered in woodlands with some beautiful waterfalls set amid the forest. In 1836, Major Thomas Mitchell named the Grampians after one of the main mountain ranges in the highlands of Scotland, He wrote that they, were:

a noble range of mountains, rising in the south to a stupendous height, and presenting as bold and picturesque an outline as a painter ever imagined.

The Grampians is a perfect location for sightseeing and experiencing the Australian wilderness. Activities here include: hiking, camping, swimming, fishing, and just admiring the scenery and wildlife. You can also try boating, fishing, or swimming in Lake Wartook. There are numerous waterfalls in the park which are easily accessible via a well developed track and road network.

Rock climbing is popular here given the many sandstone ridges and cliffs in the park. The highest peak is Mount William at 1167 metres.

Grampians National Park is rich in flora and fauna. The area contains around 970 species of native plants, 100 species of bird, 35 types of mammal, 28 different reptiles, 20 amphibians and fish. Even the duck-billed platypus exists in the rivers and streams here. This species belongs to a unique and rare order of mammal called monotremes which lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young like marsupials. In Spring, the Grampians puts on a spectacular display of wildflowers.

More Photos

Cathedral Rock photo
Reed Lookout photo
Sandstone Hill photo
Boroka Lookout photo
Victoria Valley photo
Pyrenees View photo
Victoria Valley photo
Mt Mirchell View photo
Serra Range photo
Lake Bellfield photo
Baroka Lookout photo
Rock Formations photo
Jaws of Death photo
Reed Lookout photo
Lake Wartook photo
Grampians Road photo
Mt Sturgeon photo
Serra Range photo
Stony Creek photo
Grampians River photo
Mt Sturgeon photo
Serra Range photo
Victoria Valley photo
Rock Face photo
Mt Mitchell photo
Serra Range photo
Silent Street Grampians photo
Boroka Lookout photo
Grand Canyon Wall photo
Grand Canyon photo
Mt Mitchell photo
Boroka Lookout photo
Mt Mitchell View photo
Reed Lookout photo
Serra Range photo
Boroka Lookout photo
Victoria Valley photo
Grand Canyon photo
Reed Lookout photo
Pyrenees Region photo
The Balconies photo
Serra Range photo
Rock Face photo
Broken Falls photo

 

 

Author & photographer: David Johnson (Virtual Oceania). Providing a credit or link is appreciated.
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